The adductor complex is the group of muscles which squeeze your thighs together. Since women often sit with crossed legs the adductor muscles commonly develop excessive tension.

There are several reasons you might wish to stretch the groin and inside of the thigh muscles called the hip and thigh adductors (opposite of abductors). You might have pulled the groin and been recommended to gently stretch or you may have  a pelvic problem requiring more flexibility.

You might even a knee issue, such as when a weaker gluteus medius pulls against the stronger adductor muscles causing imbalance at the knee joint, causing an injury. When the adductors are short and tight, they can have an effect on one of two places, the top of the muscle, which is the pelvis, or the lower end – which is the knee. As a weaker joint, it is most likely the knee joint which is going to be affected since the tight adductors can cause the femur to become internally rotated.

A likely result of this imbalance is knee pain, since the joints of the knee will no longer line up properly. Tight adductors can be demonstrated by a knock-kneed appearance. This indicator of adductor tightness is especially evident in the bottom of a squat when the hips are almost fully flexed.

 

 

Butterfly Stretch

  • Sit on the floor.
  • Press the soles of your feet together.
  • Pull your feet the closest you can.
  • Put your hands on your ankles to where your elbows are lined up with your knees.
  • Push against your elbows trying to close your legs. (This contracts your groin muscles to help you get a deeper stretch.)
  • Push your knees down.

The first way to stretch your pulled groin is the butterfly stretch, a stretch of modest difficulty that should be accessible enough for practically anyone to have a go at it. You begin this stretch by first sitting on the ground. Bend both of your knees in such a way that the bottoms of both of your feet end up touching each other. At this stage, make use of your hands to hold on to your feet. While in this position, use both of your elbows to make contact with your knees and then push them down toward the floor. Keep this position for about 10 to 15 seconds, but keep in mind that this should be a gentle stretch. If you start to feel some pain beyond the mere stretch, back off the motion.

 

Lunges

Lunges are another effective way to stretch your pulled groin. Get yourself into the lunge position, which involves standing with your feet shoulder width apart, then stepping forward with one foot so that your heel lands first. In the lunge position, make sure that your knee is at 90 degrees and right over your toes.

Now, put both your left knee as well as your right foot on the ground. Make sure that your back is very straight and your right leg is perpendicular to the ground. To intensify the stretching your pulled groin, just lean forward just a little bit, and do so for about 10 seconds. Finally, switch up your legs and do the pulled groin stretch for your other leg.

 

Standing Groin Stretch

Start off this position by standing with your feet farther apart than shoulder width. Lean to the right side by using the weight of your body. Next, put your right elbow onto your right knee so that you succeed at stretching your left groin. While you’re doing this, keep both of your feet pointed forward. Keep your body in this position for between 15 and 20 seconds. Switch sides and do the same actions to stretch your right groin.

 

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Armadale Chiropractor

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Australia
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